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This past weekend was the Reebok 2015 CrossFit Games. Katrin Tanja Davidsdottir and Ben Smith were named the Fittest Woman and Man on Earth, respectfully! If you aren’t as familiar with CrossFit as some of us here at Frederick Foot & Ankle, just follow along as I break it down.

 

Over the past few years, CrossFit has grown into a nationwide craze. Basically, CrossFit exercises are daily, high intensity, technical workouts. Each workout of the day (WOD) consists of varied functional movements which are performed at a high intensity pace. WODs are designed to push your body to its limits by enabling you to go as hard and as fast as possible. With this in mind, two images pop into my head: extremely “fit” athletes and extremely “injured” athletes.

 

Typical CrossFit athletes are extremely competitive, whether they are former college professional athletes and/or driven fitness enthusiasts. Treating CrossFit injuries can be somewhat of a challenge. Many treatment plans include immobility and rest for proper recovery, which is not the typical nature of a CrossFit athlete. CrossFit WODs use an entirely different day-to-day approach than major lifting (deadlifts, cleans, squats), basic gymnastics (pull-ups, push-ups, handstands), and cardio (running, swimming, biking). This means participants are more likely to develop injuries such as stress fractures, ligament sprains, and muscle strains. If you or someone you know is interested in starting a CrossFit regime, don’t hesitate to stop by our office for a foot and ankle examination. We want to make sure your feet are in the best shape before you start your training. We have two offices located in Urbana, MD and Frederick, MD.

By Coralia Terol

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLrZluh6-TE

After the World Cup celebrations were all said and done, it wasn’t all fun and games for Alex Morgan.  The U.S. Women’s national team forward recently underwent right knee surgery.  They performed a minor arthroscopic procedure, cleaning the joint of all debris and excess fibrous scar tissue.  Similar procedures can be done by our local podiatrist to clean the ankle joints of arthritic fibers.  These fibers in the joint can cause a “tight” feeling, or restrict movement in your ankle.

Morgan’s minor procedure will likely put her on the sideline for three weeks or more. This will hopefully give her enough recovery time before the USWNT kicks off their World Cup Victory Tour in August. It is important to listen to your physician when discussing rest and recovery time. Morgan played in the World Cup with a left knee contusion and was unable to give it her best for five out of the seven matches. Before, in 2014, she injured her left ankle which left her with a lasting injury, restricting her playing capability permanently. There were speculations that she didn’t recover for the proper amount of time before hitting the practice field, which might end up jeopardizing her career in the long run. This is an example of why it is important to listen to your doctor when they tell you to rest and recover.

If you or anyone you know has recurring foot or ankle injuries, Frederick Foot & Ankle would love to discuss the issue and evaluate the problem. It is important to get proper treatment so that you can be on the road to recovery. Come visit us at either our Urbana, MD office or our Frederick, MD office, our Doctors and staff are here to help.

By Alvin Bannerjee

By Brenna Steinberg
July 29, 2015
Category: Podiatry

The two months between graduating podiatry school and starting residency come and go in a flash. Thousands of new doctors graduate from podiatry school and start their journey to becoming a certified doctor. In order to complete these final steps to becoming a Podiatrist, each graduate must participate and complete their long and torturous residencies.

One of our staff members recently graduated podiatry school and is doing her residency in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In residency, graduates work in hospitals doing and learning about the jobs they will have after they are certified. Graduates take care of patients around the clock and help run hospitals alongside the senior Doctors. You are at the hospital so much that you essentially become a “resident” of the hospital, like many of the patients in your care.  

July 1st was the official start date for Jackie, our graduate, orientation started slow and quickly progressed. She described her first couple weeks there as being bombarded with pagers that no one knew how to work, important ext. numbers that no one remembered, and getting little sleep. On top of learning how to cope with a new and difficult lifestyle graduates must learn very quickly how to translate what  they have been studying for the past four years into real life and apply it to real patients.

A typical day in residency starts at 4-4:30am, this is so doctors can make their rounds and see all their patients by the time morning meeting starts.  Making rounds on patients means while checking on your patient you evaluate the progression of their problem, whether its infections, post-surgery, or trauma. After concluding whether the patient’s condition is worsening or improving, you write a note on the patients chart summarizing your assessment, their prognosis, and your plan of treatment.

The particular program Jackie is in sees a lot of foot and ankle trauma. For instance, if you google “The most dangerous intersection in America” the #1 result is within the hospital's limits. Being stationed in Philadelphia Jackie sees all sorts of traumas, this past weekend our podiatry service saw two pediatric ankle fractures, two open fractures where the bones were showing, and a polytrauma from a motorcycle accident.

Nevertheless, residency is a part of every podiatrist career. It is where we are tested on what we have learned from school and how we cope with the new information we learn each day. If you or anyone you know are interested in podiatric medicine, feel free to come visit us either in our Frederick office or our Urbana office. One of our amazing doctors at Frederick Foot & Ankle would love to help answer any questions you may have about podiatry or what it is like to be a podiatrist. 

By Brenna Steinberg

By Nikki Ho
July 13, 2015
Category: Sports

 This past Sunday, the US Women’s soccer team won the title of World Cup Champions. Carli Lloyd was the girl to beat, within the first sixteen minutes of the World Cup Final she showed Japan who was boss, and set the tone for her team-mates and the rest of the game. The game ended in a dramatic victory for the US Women’s national team, with a winning score of five to two. Many of us here at Frederick Foot & Ankle attended viewing parties to watch the final live and enjoyed partying and celebrating alongside the victorious World Cup Champions.

(http://www.cnn.com/2015/07/06/living/feat-womens-soccer-victory-uphill-struggle-equal-recognition/)

(http://www.cnn.com/2015/07/06/living/feat-womens-soccer-victory-uphill-struggle-equal-recognition/)

 

However, the party did not stop there for the Women’s team. After returning back to the United States, the World Cup team stopped in New York City where they were greeted by thousands of fans and presented with individual keys to the city. The team then participated in a victory parade through the city streets and continued the winning celebrations.  

(https://twitter.com/ussoccer_wnt/status/619534118179704832/photo/1)

 

Taylor Swift invited the team to come celebrate with her on stage at MetLife Stadium! How cool is that?

(http://ftw.usatoday.com/2015/07/taylor-swift-us-womens-national-team-1989-tour)

 

All of these talented women must maintain healthy feet and ankles in order to continue their careers, they understand the importance of having pains and concerns looked at by a professional Doctor or Podiatrist. If you or anyone you know has any foot or ankle pain please do not hesitate to visit us at either our Urbana, MD or Frederick, MD office. After all, we want to keep you moving this upcoming soccer season, who knows you might be the next Alex Morgan or Carli Lloyd!

By Nikki Ho 

By Yenisey Yanes
July 01, 2015
Category: Burns

Everyone here at Frederick Foot & Ankle wishes you a wonderful 4th of July weekend! However, we wanted to give you a few reminders so you can keep your feet happy and healthy this summer! To do this we made a holiday survival guide for you and your feet.
 

Frederick Foot & Ankle Fourth of July Survival Guide

Avoid walking barefoot. Many of us enjoy being barefoot during the summer. There is nothing quite like the feeling of sand between your toes, or grass beneath your feet, but being barefoot increases your chances of wounds and infections. If a wound is not treated properly infections can spread and cause limb loss, or permanent damage to nerves, muscles, tendons, or bones. This is why, if you are experiencing any discomfort or abnormal pain contact a medical professional. To help prevent such wounds or injuries from occurring, we recommend wearing closed toe shoes and cleaning your feet after being outside.
 

Another tip for this Fourth of July, be careful while handling fireworks. Thousands of burns occur every Fourth of July due to fireworks. These burns usually occur on our extremities such as our hands, legs, and feet. A severe burn can cause trauma and damage to the affected area and needs immediate care. A burn of a high degree could lead to permanent damage and should be treated accordingly.

 

So please, be careful this holiday weekend and think of your feet!
If you sustain a minor injury that does not need immediate care and would like to discuss your problem with a healthcare professional, don't hesitate to come visit us at one of our offices in Urbana, MD and Frederick, MD. Have a wonderful Fourth of July!

 

By Yenisey Yanes





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301-668-9707
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141 Thomas Johnson Dr., Suite 170 Frederick, MD 21702
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